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Thursday’s Thoughts: Do You Set Yearly Reading Goals?

Thursday's Thoughts

 

Yearly reading goals weren’t something that I started to set before I joined the bookish community. In fact, I don’t think I really knew that setting reading goals was a thing before I joined. Because we’re only a couple of weeks into the new year, I thought it’d be interesting to have a discussion about the pros and cons of setting and sticking to yearly reading goals.

The first reason that I love reading goals is that I’m a very goal-driven person. I like setting tasks and I like accomplishing them. I love seeing the little graph on Goodreads inch closer to 100%. Yearly reading goals are also super flexible and customizable, and they vary year by year depending on what grade I’m in and the amount of academic stress that each grade carries. That flexibility is definitely another one of my favorite aspects about setting reading goals.

I also like to be able to track my reading stats, and Goodreads does an awesome job of doing that and bringing them all together at the end of the year. I also really enjoy seeing other people set and achieve their own reading goals, and I find it to be a really good motivator for me.

Setting yearly reading goals also helps to keep me accountable. If I don’t see that little graph on Goodreads telling me I’m ahead or behind schedule, it’s really easy for me to just let reading fall by the wayside. To be honest, I have so many other things on my plate. But setting yearly reading goals ensures that reading is also on my plate, even if I don’t actually eat it at every meal. That was a weird metaphor, but hopefully you all get my point.

On the flipside, I have heard that reading goals can take the fun out of reading. Because there can be a point where you’re just reading to hit a goal, and not reading because you actually enjoy it. I counter this my usually setting lower goals, or ones that I think I can achieve and possibly go over. That way I’m not forcing myself to overread. But besides this point, I don’t really see any other potential negatives to setting yearly reading goals.

I’d love to discuss in the comments, what do you think are the pros and cons of setting yearly reading goals? Do they work for you, do they not work for you? Do you stick to them after you set them? Let me know!

As always,

Happy reading, happy writing, and happy blogging!

-Breeny

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7 thoughts on “Thursday’s Thoughts: Do You Set Yearly Reading Goals?

  1. I have so much respect for people who set really ambitious reading goals, because I know I would not have the drive to complete them😂 despite this, I stop find myself promising something regarding my reading every year. Most of the time, it’s the promise that this is the year I will FINALLY get to those 57 series that everyone reccomends to me. This year, I want to try to read more outside YA; I think for me, goals based more on content rather than numbers work better.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I didn’t really know about reading goals either until I joined Goodreads and when I didn’t meet my reading goals I was kind of disappointed. So I finally set my goal to 1 book last year and read more than I did before which made me happy. So I don’t really do reading goals in terms of amount yet. I do them based on categories. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hmm, I never actually thought about reading goals, mostly because (like you said) it can take the fun out of reading. I either have this mood where I really want to read all the time or I can’t be bothered to pick up a book for months. Great post!

    Larice x || http://hilarice.com

    Liked by 1 person

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